The fall and rise of neural variability reveals the stimulus driven engagement and disengagement of neural networks

Is being presented now (1-5 pm). By yours truly.

This is a live blogging/poster presenting experiment. The first of this kind, to my knowledge.

Comment below.

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13 Responses to The fall and rise of neural variability reveals the stimulus driven engagement and disengagement of neural networks

  1. Lascap says:

    The decorrelated neural circuits are on the other side of my poster board, wow.

  2. Adam says:

    I like the idea of looking at changes in neural variability in a different setting than the original interacted delay task. Keep going with that.

  3. Jamie Fitzgerald says:

    Very interesting. I’m looking forward to seeing the results from your low contrast manipulation.
    Best,
    Jamie

  4. Jeremy Freeman says:

    Good job!

  5. Thu says:

    Pascal’s presentation was performance art!!!

  6. Michael says:

    Why are you so keen on showing pictures of people in your presentations?

  7. Lukas brostek says:

    Nice finding!
    Gruesse aus tut!

  8. Jake says:

    Pascal’s voice is sounding pretty hoarse after what I’m sure is the umpteenth run-through of his poster. Someone is on their way to bring him water. I’m about to ask him a question, so hopefully I won’t make it worse.

  9. David Jones says:

    Suggested you look at changes in uncertainty, instead of just contrast, in relation to reduction of variability.

  10. Dani says:

    coefficient of variation in persistent activity during delay match to sample tasks does not change substantially before w.r.t. Spontaneous activity levels (gold man-rakic et al)

  11. Caroline robertson says:

    Amazing – science as an interactive performance.

  12. Lascap says:

    And that concludes this presentation and live blogging experiment. I learned a lot. Scientists are shy. A felt 5 percent (if that) of visitors left a comment.
    @Michael: Because research is a human enterprise and I feel it important to never forget that. On a more practical level, around 200 people now know who Fano was, and they did not know before. Given what we know about memory for faces, they are unlikely to ever forget it.

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